Appreciate art on a budget

Appreciating art and collecting art is often seen as high-end luxury that only the upper class can indulge in. Photo: Sazzad Ibne Sayed

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For those living on a budget but still want to collect and support art, there are several ways to do so.

Appreciating art and collecting art is often seen as high-end luxury that only the upper class can indulge in. Photo: Sazzad Ibne Sayed

Appreciating art and collecting art is often considered a high-end luxury that only a specific upper class can indulge in. The misconception lies in the understanding that one can only support the arts by emptying their pockets to buy lavish works of art. There is no doubt that these expensive masterpieces of art are worth the price and the artists should be compensated for their hard work. However, for those living on a budget but wanting to consume and support art, there are several other ways to do so.

make known

Supporting the arts doesn’t have to start from afar. There are many of us, friends, family and acquaintances who might try to explore our creativity through art. Some might do oil paintings, some might do face art. Whatever the genre or the canvas, amateur artists must be supported so that they can develop fully. With social media being the most popular platform today, if your artist friend promotes their work on social media, it might give them a boost to share their work online even if you can’t. buy him.

Support local artists and student artists

Small local artists often lack the financial means to ensure the sustainability of their work. Despite the passion and talent, they might lack the resources. Similarly, student artists often try to get their work out by selling their work independently.

Charukala students often sell their paintings and photographs at exhibitions and at moderate prices. Photo: Sazzad Ibn Sayed

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For those on a budget but want to collect and support art, there are several ways to do so.

Charukala students often sell their paintings and photographs at exhibitions and at moderate prices. Photo: Sazzad Ibn Sayed

As an art enthusiast or connoisseur on a budget, buying from these artists not only opens up an avenue to consume interesting art, but also funds these artists. Charukala students often sell their paintings and photographs at exhibitions and at moderate prices. Students from the University of Alternative Development (UODA) sell their work around Dhanmondi Lake. These awards leave no hole in the wallet as students seek to understand if their work is worth buying and how far they have progressed as artists. Thus, supporting local students and artists would provide a chance to secure the first works of potential future artists, be introduced to a plethora of experimental art, and keep the art scene vibrant.

Free art galleries

Appreciating art doesn’t just mean engaging directly with artists. For self-gratification and exposure to different types of creativity, going to art galleries is a great way to improve one’s understanding of art. Exhibitions held at places like Bangladesh’s Shilpakala Academy and Zainul Gallery often showcase a unique array of artistic styles. Starting from local productions and sometimes calling on the work of expatriates, these galleries make the creativity of artists cinematic and filled with movement and stories. Buying art from these galleries can be a bit pricey, however, the artistic exposure these venues provide is key to broadening and diversifying one’s tastes in the creative world.

The art of the rickshaw

Another way to indulge in artwork unique to Bengali heritage is to support what is now known as rickshaw art. The Facebook page Rickshaw Paint/Art of Bangladesh makes maps, portraits and paintings on clay pots. The style of this work resembles that seen on rickshaws and movie posters before digital posters appeared. This art style is not only unique, but also a great way for an art lover to delve deeper into the local and traditional art scene.

Posters and replicas

Posters are very popular these days. These posters often feature music album covers, iconic pop culture figures, and just about anything in between. Sometimes posters can also reproduce works of art that have gained popularity among the general public. For example, “Starry Night” by Van Gogh, “The Great Wave off Kanagawa” by Hokusai, “Girl with a Pearl Earring” by Vermeer, and “Mona Lisa” by Da Vinci are some of the famous artworks. most often reproduced. These works are often used on posters, bags, shoes and other merchandise. Now, whether or not replicas can be considered a real art form depends on our own perceptions. To answer this question, having exposure to many types of art styles and being an advocate for local artists might provide some insight.

Overall, art is accessible to everyone. Creatives in this field cannot be limited to a group of people. The misconception that supporting the creative field requires a large sum of money is quite wrong, because being an advocate or connoisseur of the arts does not only involve buying art, but also understanding and perceive art.

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