Germany seeks to legalize cannabis

As announced by the Minister of Health GermanyKarl Lauterbach, there is a bill to legalize cannabis for recreational use.

For recreational use

The bill will allow individuals to possess 20 to 30 grams for consumption. Germans will also be allowed to cultivate privately according to regulations. Criminal cases involving cannabis would all be dropped. The government will introduce a cannabis tax and provide cannabis education.

“The biggest question in the current legislative proposal is and remains the interpretation by the European Commission,” said Bloomwell Group CEO Niklas Kouparanis. The Bloomwell Group is one of the largest medical cannabis operators in Germany. “If the Commission says no to Germany’s current approach to cannabis legalization, our government should seek alternative solutions.”

Bloomwell Group co-founder Anna-Sophia Kouparanis wants to eradicate THC limits on products and help those in cannabis custody transition into the legal cannabis trade. “It would be optimal to also extend the considerations to players in the current illicit market and help them transition into the legal market for adult use,” Kouparanis said.

must be the money

hamburg-germany-solo-trip

Photo credit: Christoph Mahlstedt

The policy was mooted a year ago by Chancellor Olaf Scholz, who intended to become one of the first European countries to legalize the herb. Instead, a law was passed to allow the controlled distribution of cannabis products in licensed stores. Although the country is taking its time in legalizing recreational use, it has found some advantages in legalizing cannabis. The benefits of legalization could generate nearly $5 billion in profits for Germany and create nearly 30,000 new jobs.

Haters gonna hate

Even with the benefits of cannabis legalization, some German states are totally against it. For example, the Bavarian Minister of Health does not want Germany to become a destination for “drug tourism”. He thinks it could affect the country’s identity vis-à-vis the rest of the world. However, there are political parties that advocate for legalization. The Green Party, Social Democrats and Free Democrats have been strong advocates of legalization and are currently drafting their proposals. The country will present the legislation to the European Commission and based on their assessment it will be decided. Health Minister Lauterbach hopes the bill will be passed in 2024.

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