New York’s veteran gangsters fear Millennial Mafiosi will soften up

0

The new generation of gangsters roaming the streets of New York have been accused of “softening” by the old guard of Mafia bosses, relying on threatening texts to intimidate rivals instead of speaking with their fists or guns.

The explosion of social media and mobile phone technology, along with the gentrification of working-class Italian-American neighborhoods, has spawned a generation of ‘soft’ gangsters whose distaste for brutality and comfortable upbringing pose a difficult problem for veteran mobsters.

A suspected gangster sent a threatening text to a union official who read: “Hey, this is the 2nd text, there won’t be a 3rd,” according to court documents associated with a huge anti-racketeering operation in New York. reported in the Wall Street Journal.

Meanwhile, old Mafia bosses are forced to take risks by staying in the game long after they retire to ensure their plans don’t go wrong in the hands of budding gangsters who have been raised using texts instead of whips.

Last month, 87-year-old gangster Andrew ‘Mush’ Russo was arrested in a massive anti-racketeering operation that prosecutors compared to a shakedown similar to those depicted on TV shows as’ The Sopranos’ (photo)

'[The Mafia] certainly don't kill people like before, ”said former FBI agent Michael Gaeta (Photo: Robert De Niro and Ray Liotta in“ Goodfellas ”, 1990)

‘[The Mafia] certainly don’t kill people like before, ”said former FBI agent Michael Gaeta (Photo: Robert De Niro and Ray Liotta in“ Goodfellas ”, 1990)

Last month, 87-year-old gangster Andrew ‘Mush’ Russo was arrested as part of the Colombo crime family’s extortion operation to line their pockets by controlling the insurance fund illness of a city construction union.

The octogenarian Russo was among eleven members of the crime family arrested in the scheme, which prosecutors compared to a grandiose shakedown similar to those depicted in “The Sopranos” and “Goodfellas.”

Much like in The Sopranos, it seems Russo struggled to find a young successor who was trustworthy or capable enough to get the job done.

Instead, he was forced to personally supervise the operation and was arrested by law enforcement.

Russo can be heard complaining “I can’t go, I can’t rest!” in a secret FBI recording released in connection with the case, as he struggled to deal with a group of suitors who were unaware of the brutally effective ways of the thugs of old according to the the Wall Street newspaper,

Scott Curtis, a former FBI agent who was tasked with investigating the crime family’s schemes, said Russo was managing underlings and had kept his job “too long”.

“That’s why you see some of these guys getting arrested over and over,” Curtis said.

“They have to get their hands on all these minute details of the plan.”

The octogenarian Russo was among eleven crime family members arrested in connection with the scheme and was heard complaining

The octogenarian Russo was among eleven crime family members arrested in connection with the scheme and was heard complaining “I can’t leave, I can’t rest!” in a secret FBI recording in reference to his distrust of clumsy young mobsters

Theodore 'Skinny Teddy' Persico Jr was also among the mobsters arrested in connection with the extortion operation

Capo Vincent 'Vinny Unions' Ricciardo, 75, allegedly threatened to kill union boss

Several sub-bosses and lower-level gangsters were also arrested in connection with the New York union’s extortion operation, as the Colombo crime family sought to line their pockets by controlling the insurance fund. illness of a city construction union.

Another Colombo family gangster, a former male in the organization, complained to the Wall Street Journal that “everything is on the phone with them”, referring to the young mobster arrested in connection with the case .

Meanwhile, former FBI agent and crisis management consultant Richard Frankel said the younger generation’s reliance on cellphones poses even more problems for older Mafia bosses because it’s too easy to leave incriminating messages that could be used as evidence.

“I’m sure this is frowned upon in Mafia circles,” said a bemused Frankel.

Another former FBI agent, Michael Gaeta, said that although New York’s notorious criminal families are still operating, the mobsters are trying to keep a low profile by reducing violence after major FBI operations in the ’90s gutted much of senior management.

“They certainly don’t kill people like they used to. In the end, it draws too much heat, ”he said.

The explosion of social media and mobile phone technology, along with the gentrification of working-class Italian-American neighborhoods, is believed to be behind a wave of young

The explosion of social media and mobile phone technology, along with the gentrification of working-class Italian-American neighborhoods, is believed to be behind a wave of young “knucklehead” gangsters (pictured, Little Italy, Manhattan, NYC in 2012)

A professor from the NYU School of Law said that Italian-American neighborhoods had shrunk considerably,

A professor at the NYU School of Law said that Italian-American neighborhoods had shrunk considerably, “resulting in a shortage of tough teens for Mafia succession. (Pictured: the corner of Broome St and Center St in Manhattan, New York)

New York University Law School Professor James B. Jacobs believes today’s gentler generation of mobsters was formed because the gentrification of New York City virtually wiped out neighborhoods once bustling Italian-American workers.

“Fifty years ago, most major American cities had Italian neighborhoods well known to the working class. [The Mafia] hired teenagers, some of whom were Italian immigrants, for odd jobs and recruited the most promising in their operations, ”he wrote in his 2019 book“ The Rise and Fall of Organized Crime in the United States ”.

“These neighborhoods have shrunk considerably as Italian-Americans have gradually assimilated into mainstream society, drastically diminishing the pool of tough teens with Cosa Nostra’s potential.”

Cosa Nostra, directly translated as “Our Thing”, is the term used to refer to the traditional Sicilian Mafia, one of the most brutal and well-known original Mafiosi groups still operating in Sicily today.

Deputy head of Gambino family dies in prison of “health problems” at age 89

Frank LoCascio, the former deputy chief and acting adviser to Dapper Don, died on Friday after serving 31 years of a life sentence

Frank LoCascio, the former deputy chief and acting adviser to Dapper Don, died on Friday after serving 31 years of a life sentence

A deputy head of the Gambino crime family who remained loyal to John Gotti even as the couple were sentenced to life in a 1992 murder and racketeering trial has died in prison at the age of 89.

Frank LoCascio, the former deputy chief and acting advisor to Dapper Don, died Friday October 1 at the Federal Medical Center in Devens – a facility that houses federal prisoners with health problems – in Massachusetts.

LoCascio had been jailed for 31 years before his death last week after refusing to go after notorious Mafia boss Gotti in their infamous and high-profile trial.

The high-ranking mobster managed to cheat death during his three decades in the pen even with Gotti as an enemy, after the Teflon Don turned on him and put a “contract” on his life. former right-hand man after a prison feud, prison officials revealed.

“I am guilty of being a good friend of John Gotti,” the provocative deputy chief said in court after refusing to turn on his boss instead of a more lenient sentence.

“If there were more men like John Gotti, we would have a better country,” the gangster proudly professed at the time.

Career criminal LoCascio, pictured here at right, next to boss John Gotti, has managed to cheat death during his three decades in the pen even with Gotti as an enemy, after the Teflon Don turned on him and put a

Career criminal LoCascio, pictured here at right, next to boss John Gotti, has managed to cheat death during his three decades in the pen even with Gotti as an enemy, after the Teflon Don turned on him and put a ‘contract’ on his former right-hand man life after prison feud, prison officials revealed


Source link

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.